Articles | Volume 19, issue 6
Biogeosciences, 19, 1611–1633, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-1611-2022
Biogeosciences, 19, 1611–1633, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-1611-2022
Research article
21 Mar 2022
Research article | 21 Mar 2022

Grazing enhances carbon cycling but reduces methane emission during peak growing season in the Siberian Pleistocene Park tundra site

Wolfgang Fischer et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 2,431 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
1,499 901 31 2,431 27 29
  • HTML: 1,499
  • PDF: 901
  • XML: 31
  • Total: 2,431
  • BibTeX: 27
  • EndNote: 29
Views and downloads (calculated since 09 Jun 2021)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 09 Jun 2021)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 2,431 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 2,283 with geography defined and 148 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 08 Dec 2022
Download
Short summary
Arctic permafrost ecosystems may release large amounts of carbon under warmer future climates and may therefore accelerate global climate change. Our study investigated how long-term grazing by large animals influenced ecosystem characteristics and carbon budgets at a Siberian permafrost site. Our results demonstrate that such management can contribute to stabilizing ecosystems to keep carbon in the ground, particularly through drying soils and reducing methane emissions.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint