Articles | Volume 19, issue 12
Biogeosciences, 19, 2969–2988, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2969-2022
Biogeosciences, 19, 2969–2988, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2969-2022
Research article
21 Jun 2022
Research article | 21 Jun 2022

Wintertime process study of the North Brazil Current rings reveals the region as a larger sink for CO2 than expected

Léa Olivier et al.

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Short summary
We investigate the impact of the interactions between eddies and the Amazon River plume on the CO2 air–sea fluxes to better characterize the ocean carbon sink in winter 2020. The region is a strong CO2 sink, previously underestimated by a factor of 10 due to a lack of data and understanding of the processes responsible for the variability in ocean carbon parameters. The CO2 absorption is mainly driven by freshwater from the Amazon entrained by eddies and by the winter seasonal cooling.
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