Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-296
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-296

  11 Nov 2021

11 Nov 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal BG.

Variations in and environmental controls of primary productivity in the Amundsen Sea

Jianlong Feng1, Delei Li2,3, Jing Zhang1, and Liang Zhao1 Jianlong Feng et al.
  • 1Key Laboratory of Marine Resource Chemistry and Food Technology (TUST), Ministry of Education, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457, China
  • 2CAS Key Laboratory of Ocean Circulation and Waves, Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, China
  • 3Center for Ocean Mega-Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, China

Abstract. The Amundsen Sea is one of the regions with the highest primary productivity in the Antarctic. To better understand the role of the Southern Ocean in the global carbon cycle and in climate regulation, a better understanding of the variations in and environmental controls of primary productivity is needed. Using cluster analysis, the Amundsen Sea was divided into nine bioregions. The biophysical differences among bioregions enhanced confidence to identify priorities and regions to study the temporal and spatial variations in primary productivity. Four nearshore bioregions with high net primary productivity or rapidly increasing rates were selected to analyze temporal and spatial variations in primary productivity in the Amundsen Sea. Due to changes in net solar radiation and sea ice, primary production had significant seasonal variation in these four bioregions. The phenology had changed at two bioregions (3 and 5), which has the third and fourth highest primary production, due to changes in the dissolved iron, nitrate, phosphate, and silicate concentrations. Annual primary production showed increasing trends in these four bioregions. The variation in primary production in the bioregion (9), which has the highest primary production, was mainly affected by variations in sea surface temperatures. In the bioregion, which has the second-highest primary production (8), the primary production was significantly positively correlated with sea surface temperature and significantly negatively correlated with sea ice thickness. The long-term changes of primary productivity in bioregions 3 and 5 were thought to be related to changes in the dissolved iron, nitrate, phosphate, and silicate concentrations, and dissolved iron was the limiting factor in these two bioregions. Bioregionalization not only disentangle multiple factors that control the spatial differences, but also disentangle limiting factors that affect the phenology, decadal and long-term changes in primary productivity.

Jianlong Feng et al.

Status: open (until 24 Dec 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-296', Anonymous Referee #1, 28 Nov 2021 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-296', Anonymous Referee #2, 02 Dec 2021 reply

Jianlong Feng et al.

Jianlong Feng et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 261 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
221 37 3 261 16 1 1
  • HTML: 221
  • PDF: 37
  • XML: 3
  • Total: 261
  • Supplement: 16
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 1
Views and downloads (calculated since 11 Nov 2021)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 11 Nov 2021)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 248 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 248 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 02 Dec 2021
Download
Short summary
Although some studies have been conducted on primary productivity in the Amundsen Sea, the spatial differences and mechanisms that drive differences in phenology, decadal and long-term changes in primary productivity are still not clear. We first obtained a bioregional map of the Amundsen Sea. Using the bioregionalization outputs, the limiting factors that affect spatial differences, the phenology, decadal and long-term changes of primary productivity was analyzed.
Altmetrics