Articles | Volume 13, issue 14
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-4219-2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-4219-2016
Research article
 | 
26 Jul 2016
Research article |  | 26 Jul 2016

Long-term drainage reduces CO2 uptake and increases CO2 emission on a Siberian floodplain due to shifts in vegetation community and soil thermal characteristics

Min Jung Kwon, Martin Heimann, Olaf Kolle, Kristina A. Luus, Edward A. G. Schuur, Nikita Zimov, Sergey A. Zimov, and Mathias Göckede

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A decade-long drainage on an Arctic floodplain has altered dominant plant species and soil temperature regimes. Consequently, CO2 exchange rates between the atmosphere and the terrestrial ecosystem were modified: CO2 uptake rates by the terrestrial ecosystem decreased and CO2 emission rates to the atmosphere increased. Ongoing global warming may thaw ice-rich permafrost and make some regions drier in the Arctic, and this will reduce carbon accumulation in the terrestrial ecosystem.
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