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Volume 13, issue 14
Biogeosciences, 13, 4219–4235, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-4219-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: Changing Permafrost in the Arctic and its Global Effects in...

Biogeosciences, 13, 4219–4235, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-4219-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 26 Jul 2016

Research article | 26 Jul 2016

Long-term drainage reduces CO2 uptake and increases CO2 emission on a Siberian floodplain due to shifts in vegetation community and soil thermal characteristics

Min Jung Kwon et al.

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A decade-long drainage on an Arctic floodplain has altered dominant plant species and soil temperature regimes. Consequently, CO2 exchange rates between the atmosphere and the terrestrial ecosystem were modified: CO2 uptake rates by the terrestrial ecosystem decreased and CO2 emission rates to the atmosphere increased. Ongoing global warming may thaw ice-rich permafrost and make some regions drier in the Arctic, and this will reduce carbon accumulation in the terrestrial ecosystem.
A decade-long drainage on an Arctic floodplain has altered dominant plant species and soil...
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