Articles | Volume 13, issue 17
Biogeosciences, 13, 4927–4943, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-4927-2016
Biogeosciences, 13, 4927–4943, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-4927-2016

Research article 07 Sep 2016

Research article | 07 Sep 2016

Depth-resolved particle-associated microbial respiration in the northeast Atlantic

Anna Belcher et al.

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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (24 Jun 2016) by Koji Suzuki
AR by Anna Belcher on behalf of the Authors (24 Jun 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (28 Jun 2016) by Koji Suzuki
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (30 Jun 2016)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (14 Jul 2016)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (14 Jul 2016) by Koji Suzuki
AR by Anna Belcher on behalf of the Authors (28 Jul 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (01 Aug 2016) by Koji Suzuki
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (09 Aug 2016)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (21 Aug 2016) by Koji Suzuki
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (22 Aug 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (26 Aug 2016) by Koji Suzuki
AR by Anna Belcher on behalf of the Authors (26 Aug 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
We address the imbalance between the supply and loss of organic carbon to the upper layer of the ocean by measuring a previously poorly quantified term: particle-associated microbial respiration of in situ particles. We find rates that are too low to account for the missing sink of carbon and suggest instead that zooplankton drive the transformation of large fast-sinking particles into slow-sinking and suspended particles. This apparent loss may help explain imbalances in the carbon budget.
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