Articles | Volume 14, issue 22
Biogeosciences, 14, 5077–5097, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5077-2017
Biogeosciences, 14, 5077–5097, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5077-2017

Research article 15 Nov 2017

Research article | 15 Nov 2017

Complex controls on nitrous oxide flux across a large-elevation gradient in the tropical Peruvian Andes

Torsten Diem et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (16 Jun 2017) by Fortunat Joos
AR by Yit Arn Teh on behalf of the Authors (25 Jul 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (31 Jul 2017) by Fortunat Joos
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (12 Aug 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (20 Aug 2017)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (13 Sep 2017) by Fortunat Joos
AR by Yit Arn Teh on behalf of the Authors (19 Sep 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (19 Sep 2017) by Fortunat Joos
AR by Yit Arn Teh on behalf of the Authors (25 Sep 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Montane ecosystems in the southern Peruvian Andes were atmospheric sources of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, exceeding prior emissions estimates from bottom-up process models. Nitrous oxide flux originated primarily from nitrate reduction. Nitrous oxide fluxes showed an inverse trend with elevation, and only weak evidence of seasonal variability. Nitrous oxide fluxes were influenced by the availability of nitrate and soil moisture content, but were not predicted by inputs of labile carbon.
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