Articles | Volume 14, issue 22
Biogeosciences, 14, 5077–5097, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5077-2017
Biogeosciences, 14, 5077–5097, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5077-2017

Research article 15 Nov 2017

Research article | 15 Nov 2017

Complex controls on nitrous oxide flux across a large-elevation gradient in the tropical Peruvian Andes

Torsten Diem et al.

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Cited articles

Baggs, E. M., Richter, M., Hartwig, U. A., and Cadisch, G.: Nitrous oxide emissions from grass swards during the eighth year of elevated atmospheric pCO2 (Swiss FACE), Glob. Change Biol., 9, 1214–1222, 2003.
Bai, E., Houlton, B. Z., and Wang, Y. P.: Isotopic identification of nitrogen hotspots across natural terrestrial ecosystems, Biogeosciences, 9, 3287–3304, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-9-3287-2012, 2012.
Baldos, A. P., Corre, M. D., and Veldkamp, E.: Response of N cycling to nutrient inputs in forest soils across a 1000–3000 m elevation gradient in the Ecuadorian Andes, Ecology, 96, 749–761, https://doi.org/10.1890/14-0295.1, 2015.
Bateman, E. J. and Baggs, E. M.: Contributions of nitrification and denitrification to N2O emissions from soils at different water-filled pore space, Biol. Fert. Soils, 41, 379–388, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00374-005-0858-3, 2005.
Belyea, L. R. and Baird, A. J.: Beyond “The limits to peat bog growth”: Cross-scale feedback in peatland development, Ecol. Monogr., 76, 299–322, 2006.
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Short summary
Montane ecosystems in the southern Peruvian Andes were atmospheric sources of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide, exceeding prior emissions estimates from bottom-up process models. Nitrous oxide flux originated primarily from nitrate reduction. Nitrous oxide fluxes showed an inverse trend with elevation, and only weak evidence of seasonal variability. Nitrous oxide fluxes were influenced by the availability of nitrate and soil moisture content, but were not predicted by inputs of labile carbon.
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