Articles | Volume 15, issue 13
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-4245-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-4245-2018
Research article
 | 
13 Jul 2018
Research article |  | 13 Jul 2018

Large but decreasing effect of ozone on the European carbon sink

Rebecca J. Oliver, Lina M. Mercado, Stephen Sitch, David Simpson, Belinda E. Medlyn, Yan-Shih Lin, and Gerd A. Folberth

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Latest update: 23 May 2024
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Short summary
Potential gains in terrestrial carbon sequestration over Europe from elevated CO2 can be partially offset by concurrent rises in tropospheric O3. The land surface model JULES was run in a factorial suite of experiments showing that by 2050 simulated GPP was reduced by 4 to 9 % due to plant O3 damage. Large regional variations exist with larger impacts identified for temperate compared to boreal regions. Plant O3 damage was greatest over the twentieth century and declined into the future.
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