Articles | Volume 15, issue 17
Biogeosciences, 15, 5377–5393, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-5377-2018
Biogeosciences, 15, 5377–5393, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-5377-2018

Research article 06 Sep 2018

Research article | 06 Sep 2018

Integrated management of a Swiss cropland is not sufficient to preserve its soil carbon pool in the long term

Carmen Emmel et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (09 Aug 2018) by Edzo Veldkamp
AR by Carmen Emmel on behalf of the Authors (09 Aug 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (10 Aug 2018) by Edzo Veldkamp
AR by Carmen Emmel on behalf of the Authors (15 Aug 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (17 Aug 2018) by Edzo Veldkamp
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Short summary
It is of great interest to know whether croplands act as a net source or sink of atmospheric CO2 and if soil carbon (C) stocks are preserved over long timescales due to the role of C in soil fertility. For a cropland in Switzerland it was found that managing the field under the Swiss framework of the Proof of Ecological Performance (PEP) resulted in soil C losses of 18.0 %. Additional efforts are needed to bring Swiss management practices closer to the goal of preserving soil C in the long term.
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