Articles | Volume 15, issue 23
Biogeosciences, 15, 7205–7223, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-7205-2018

Special issue: The 10th International Carbon Dioxide Conference (ICDC10)...

Biogeosciences, 15, 7205–7223, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-7205-2018

Research article 04 Dec 2018

Research article | 04 Dec 2018

Southern Ocean controls of the vertical marine δ13C gradient – a modelling study

Anne L. Morée et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (01 May 2018) by Fortunat Joos
AR by Anne Morée on behalf of the Authors (05 Jun 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (06 Jun 2018) by Fortunat Joos
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (10 Aug 2018)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (17 Aug 2018) by Fortunat Joos
AR by Anne Morée on behalf of the Authors (26 Oct 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (31 Oct 2018) by Fortunat Joos
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (21 Nov 2018)
ED: Publish as is (26 Nov 2018) by Fortunat Joos
AR by Anne Morée on behalf of the Authors (27 Nov 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Changes in the distribution of the carbon isotope 13C can be used to study the climate system if the governing processes (ocean circulation and biogeochemistry) are understood. We show the Southern Ocean importance for the global 13C distribution and that changes in 13C can be strongly influenced by biogeochemistry. Interpretation of 13C as a proxy for climate signals needs to take into account the effects of changes in biogeochemistry in addition to changes in ocean circulation.
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