Articles | Volume 16, issue 13
Biogeosciences, 16, 2661–2681, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-2661-2019
Biogeosciences, 16, 2661–2681, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-2661-2019

Research article 11 Jul 2019

Research article | 11 Jul 2019

What drives the latitudinal gradient in open-ocean surface dissolved inorganic carbon concentration?

Yingxu Wu et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (23 Oct 2018) by Jack Middelburg
AR by Yingxu Wu on behalf of the Authors (23 Oct 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (26 Oct 2018) by Jack Middelburg
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (04 Dec 2018)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (05 Dec 2018) by Jack Middelburg
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (31 Jan 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (31 Jan 2019) by Jack Middelburg
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (11 Mar 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (04 Jun 2019) by Jack Middelburg
AR by Yingxu Wu on behalf of the Authors (14 Jun 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (20 Jun 2019) by Jack Middelburg
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Short summary
This study takes advantage of the GLODAPv2 database to investigate the processes driving the surface ocean dissolved inorganic carbon distribution, with the focus on its latitudinal gradient between the polar oceans and the low-latitude oceans. Based on our quantitative study, we find that temperature-driven CO2 gas exchange and high-latitude upwelling of DIC- and TA-rich deep waters are the two major drivers, with the importance of the latter not having been previously realized.
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