Articles | Volume 16, issue 24
Biogeosciences, 16, 4765–4781, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-4765-2019
Biogeosciences, 16, 4765–4781, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-4765-2019

Research article 16 Dec 2019

Research article | 16 Dec 2019

Major role of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in N2O production in the Pearl River estuary

Li Ma et al.

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (07 Aug 2019) by Silvio Pantoja
AR by Yao Zhang on behalf of the Authors (06 Sep 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (02 Oct 2019) by Silvio Pantoja
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (12 Oct 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (25 Oct 2019) by Silvio Pantoja
AR by Yao Zhang on behalf of the Authors (02 Nov 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (13 Nov 2019) by Silvio Pantoja
AR by Yao Zhang on behalf of the Authors (15 Nov 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
The major microbial process producing N2O in estuarine ecosystems remains controversial. Combining the concentrations and isotopic compositions of N2O, distributions and transcript levels of ammonia-oxidizing bacterial and archaeal amoA and denitrifier nirS genes, and in situ incubation estimates of nitrification rates and N2O production rates, we clarified that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria contributed the major part in N2O production in the upper Pearl River estuary despite their low abundance.
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