Articles | Volume 17, issue 1
Biogeosciences, 17, 163–186, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-163-2020
Biogeosciences, 17, 163–186, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-163-2020

Research article 16 Jan 2020

Research article | 16 Jan 2020

A meta-analysis of microcosm experiments shows that dimethyl sulfide (DMS) production in polar waters is insensitive to ocean acidification

Frances E. Hopkins et al.

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (18 Jul 2018) by Gerhard Herndl
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (20 Jul 2018)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (12 Aug 2018) by Gerhard Herndl
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (26 Aug 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (17 Sep 2018)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (07 Oct 2018) by Gerhard Herndl
AR by Frances Hopkins on behalf of the Authors (26 Sep 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (01 Oct 2019) by Katja Fennel
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (17 Nov 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (18 Nov 2019) by Katja Fennel
AR by Frances Hopkins on behalf of the Authors (27 Nov 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (28 Nov 2019) by Katja Fennel
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Short summary
We investigated the effects of ocean acidification (OA) on the production of climate active gas dimethylsulfide (DMS) in polar waters. We found that polar DMS production was unaffected by OA – in contrast to temperate waters, where large increases in DMS occurred. The regional differences in DMS response may reflect natural variability in community adaptation to ambient carbonate chemistry and should be taken into account in predicting the influence of future DMS emissions on Earth's climate.
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