Articles | Volume 17, issue 13
Biogeosciences, 17, 3367–3383, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-3367-2020
Biogeosciences, 17, 3367–3383, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-3367-2020

Research article 03 Jul 2020

Research article | 03 Jul 2020

From fibrous plant residues to mineral-associated organic carbon – the fate of organic matter in Arctic permafrost soils

Isabel Prater et al.

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Short summary
Large amounts of soil organic matter stored in permafrost-affected soils from Arctic Russia are present as undecomposed plant residues. This large fibrous organic matter might be highly vulnerable to microbial decay, while small mineral-associated organic matter can most probably attenuate carbon mineralization in a warmer future. Labile soil fractions also store large amounts of nitrogen, which might be lost during permafrost collapse while fostering the decomposition of soil organic matter.
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