Articles | Volume 17, issue 14
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-3779-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-3779-2020
Research article
 | 
22 Jul 2020
Research article |  | 22 Jul 2020

Relative impacts of global changes and regional watershed changes on the inorganic carbon balance of the Chesapeake Bay

Pierre St-Laurent, Marjorie A. M. Friedrichs, Raymond G. Najjar, Elizabeth H. Shadwick, Hanqin Tian, and Yuanzhi Yao

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Cited articles

Brodeur, J. R., Chen, B., Su, J., Xu, Y. Y., Hussain, N., Scaboo, K. M., Zhang, Y., Testa, J. M., and Cai, W. J.: Chesapeake Bay inorganic carbon: Spatial distribution and seasonal variability, Front. Mar. Sci., 6, 99, https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2019.00099, 2019. a, b, c
Cai, W. J.: Estuarine and coastal ocean carbon paradox: CO2 sinks or sites of terrestrial carbon incineration?, Annu. Rev. Mar. Sci., 3, 123–145, https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-marine-120709-142723, 2011. a
Cai, W. J., Hu, X., Huang, W. J., Murrell, M. C., Lehrter, J. C., Lohrenz, S. E., Chou, W. C., Zhai, W., Hollibaugh, J. T., Wang, Y., Zhao, P., Guo, X., Gundersen, K., Dai, M., and Gong, G. C.: Acidification of subsurface coastal waters enhanced by eutrophication, Nat. Geosci., 4, 766–770, https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo1297, 2011. a
Cai, W. J., Huang, W. J., Luther III, G. W., Pierrot, D., Li, M., Testa, J., Xue, M., Joesoef, A., Mann, R., Brodeur, J., Xu, Y. Y., Chen, B., Hussain, N., Waldbusser, G. G., Cornwell, J., and Kemp, W. M.: Redox reactions and weak buffering capacity lead to acidification in the Chesapeake Bay, Nat. Commun., 8, 1–12, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-00417-7, 2017. a, b
Cerco, C. F. and Noel, M. R.: Process-based primary production modeling in Chesapeake Bay, Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser., 282, 45–58, 2004. a
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Short summary
Over the past century, estuaries have experienced global (atmospheric CO2 concentrations and temperature) and regional changes (river inputs, land use), but their relative impact remains poorly known. In the Chesapeake Bay, we find that global and regional changes have worked together to enhance how much atmospheric CO2 is taken up by the estuary. The increased uptake is roughly equally due to the global and regional changes, providing crucial perspective for managers of the bay's watershed.
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