Articles | Volume 18, issue 13
Biogeosciences, 18, 4039–4058, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-4039-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 4039–4058, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-4039-2021

Research article 06 Jul 2021

Research article | 06 Jul 2021

High-resolution induced polarization imaging of biogeochemical carbon turnover hotspots in a peatland

Timea Katona et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2020-438', Andre Revil, 19 Jan 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Timea Katona, 11 Mar 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2020-438', Rutgers Newark, 03 Feb 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Timea Katona, 11 Mar 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (18 Mar 2021) by Alexandra Konings
AR by Timea Katona on behalf of the Authors (22 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (26 Apr 2021) by Alexandra Konings
RR by Andre Revil (26 Apr 2021)
RR by Rutgers Newark (10 May 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (15 May 2021) by Alexandra Konings
AR by Timea Katona on behalf of the Authors (22 May 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (29 May 2021) by Alexandra Konings
Download
Short summary
We used electrical geophysical methods to map variations in the rates of microbial activity within a wetland. Our results show that the highest electrical conductive and capacitive properties relate to the highest concentrations of phosphates, carbon, and iron; thus, we can use them to characterize the geometry of the biogeochemically active areas or hotspots.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint