Articles | Volume 18, issue 13
Biogeosciences, 18, 4117–4141, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-4117-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 4117–4141, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-4117-2021

Reviews and syntheses 12 Jul 2021

Reviews and syntheses | 12 Jul 2021

Reviews and syntheses: Ongoing and emerging opportunities to improve environmental science using observations from the Advanced Baseline Imager on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites

Anam M. Khan et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2020-454', Anonymous Referee #1, 15 Feb 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Anam Khan, 13 Mar 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2020-454', Anonymous Referee #2, 16 Feb 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Anam Khan, 13 Mar 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (19 Mar 2021) by Alexandra Konings
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (11 May 2021)  Author's response
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (15 May 2021) by Alexandra Konings
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (19 May 2021) by Alexandra Konings
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (04 Jun 2021)
ED: Publish as is (06 Jun 2021) by Alexandra Konings
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Short summary
Remote sensing has played an important role in the study of land surface processes. Geostationary satellites, such as the GOES-R series, can observe the Earth every 5–15 min, providing us with more observations than widely used polar-orbiting satellites. Here, we outline current efforts utilizing geostationary observations in environmental science and look towards the future of GOES observations in the carbon cycle, ecosystem disturbance, and other areas of application in environmental science.
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