Articles | Volume 18, issue 2
Biogeosciences, 18, 585–604, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-585-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 585–604, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-585-2021

Research article 27 Jan 2021

Research article | 27 Jan 2021

Timing of drought in the growing season and strong legacy effects determine the annual productivity of temperate grasses in a changing climate

Claudia Hahn et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (06 Oct 2020) by Akihiko Ito
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (20 Oct 2020)  Author's response
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (29 Oct 2020) by Akihiko Ito
AR by Claudia Hahn on behalf of the Authors (01 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (04 Dec 2020) by Akihiko Ito
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Short summary
While existing studies focus on the immediate effects of drought events on grassland productivity, long-term effects are mostly neglected. But, to conclude universal outcomes, studies must consider comprehensive ecosystem mechanisms. In our study, we found that the resistance of growth rates to drought in grasses varies across seasons, and positive legacy effects of drought indicate a high resilience. The high resilience compensates for immediate drought effects on grasses to a large extent.
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