Articles | Volume 18, issue 24
Biogeosciences, 18, 6579–6588, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-6579-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 6579–6588, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-6579-2021

Research article 23 Dec 2021

Research article | 23 Dec 2021

Extreme events driving year-to-year differences in gross primary productivity across the US

Alexander J. Turner et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-49', Anonymous Referee #1, 28 Mar 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC1', Alexander Turner, 21 Sep 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-49', Anonymous Referee #2, 14 Jun 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Alexander Turner, 21 Sep 2021
  • EC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-49', Paul Stoy, 16 Jun 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on EC1', Alexander Turner, 21 Sep 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (13 Oct 2021) by Paul Stoy
AR by Alexander Turner on behalf of the Authors (21 Oct 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (02 Nov 2021) by Paul Stoy
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (10 Nov 2021)
ED: Publish as is (18 Nov 2021) by Paul Stoy
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Short summary
This work builds a high-resolution estimate (500 m) of gross primary productivity (GPP) over the US using satellite measurements of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) from the TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) between 2018 and 2020. We identify ecosystem-specific scaling factors for estimating gross primary productivity (GPP) from TROPOMI SIF. Extreme precipitation events drive four regional GPP anomalies that account for 28 % of year-to-year GPP differences across the US.
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