Articles | Volume 19, issue 9
Biogeosciences, 19, 2417–2426, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2417-2022
Biogeosciences, 19, 2417–2426, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2417-2022
Research article
 | Highlight paper
10 May 2022
Research article  | Highlight paper | 10 May 2022

The onset of the spring phytoplankton bloom in the coastal North Sea supports the Disturbance Recovery Hypothesis

Ricardo González-Gil et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • CC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-306', michael behrenfeld, 06 Dec 2021
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-306', Anonymous Referee #1, 07 Dec 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-306', Anonymous Referee #2, 27 Dec 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (03 Feb 2022) by Koji Suzuki
AR by Ricardo González‐Gil on behalf of the Authors (09 Mar 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (16 Mar 2022) by Koji Suzuki
RR by michael behrenfeld (22 Mar 2022)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (22 Mar 2022)
ED: Publish as is (27 Mar 2022) by Koji Suzuki
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Short summary
In oceanic waters, the accumulation of phytoplankton biomass in winter, when light still limits growth, is attributed to a decrease in grazing as the mixed layer deepens. However, in coastal areas, it is not clear whether winter biomass can accumulate without this deepening. Using 21 years of weekly data, we found that in the Scottish coastal North Sea, the seasonal increase in light availability triggers the accumulation of phytoplankton biomass in winter, when light limitation is strongest.
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