Articles | Volume 19, issue 9
Biogeosciences, 19, 2417–2426, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2417-2022
Biogeosciences, 19, 2417–2426, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2417-2022
Research article
 | Highlight paper
10 May 2022
Research article  | Highlight paper | 10 May 2022

The onset of the spring phytoplankton bloom in the coastal North Sea supports the Disturbance Recovery Hypothesis

Ricardo González-Gil et al.

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Short summary
In oceanic waters, the accumulation of phytoplankton biomass in winter, when light still limits growth, is attributed to a decrease in grazing as the mixed layer deepens. However, in coastal areas, it is not clear whether winter biomass can accumulate without this deepening. Using 21 years of weekly data, we found that in the Scottish coastal North Sea, the seasonal increase in light availability triggers the accumulation of phytoplankton biomass in winter, when light limitation is strongest.
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