Articles | Volume 19, issue 10
Biogeosciences, 19, 2729–2740, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2729-2022
Biogeosciences, 19, 2729–2740, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2729-2022
Research article
01 Jun 2022
Research article | 01 Jun 2022

Fire in lichen-rich subarctic tundra changes carbon and nitrogen cycling between ecosystem compartments but has minor effects on stocks

Ramona J. Heim et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-277', Anonymous Referee #1, 17 Jan 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Ramona Heim, 19 Feb 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-277', Anonymous Referee #2, 25 Jan 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Ramona Heim, 19 Feb 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (03 Mar 2022) by Akihiko Ito
AR by Ramona Heim on behalf of the Authors (04 Apr 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (07 Apr 2022) by Akihiko Ito
AR by Ramona Heim on behalf of the Authors (16 Apr 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Fires will probably increase in Arctic regions due to climate change. Yet, the long-term effects of tundra fires on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stocks and cycling are still unclear. We investigated the long-term fire effects on C and N stocks and cycling in soil and aboveground living biomass. We found that tundra fires did not affect total C and N stocks because a major part of the stocks was located belowground in soils which were largely unaltered by fire.
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