Articles | Volume 19, issue 11
Biogeosciences, 19, 2779–2794, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2779-2022
Biogeosciences, 19, 2779–2794, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2779-2022
Research article
02 Jun 2022
Research article | 02 Jun 2022

Response of vegetation and carbon fluxes to brown lemming herbivory in northern Alaska

Jessica Plein et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-286', Anonymous Referee #1, 04 Jan 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Jessica Plein, 08 Feb 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-286', Anonymous Referee #2, 04 Jan 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Jessica Plein, 08 Feb 2022
  • RC3: 'Comment on bg-2021-286', V.M. Maire, 24 Jan 2022
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC3', Jessica Plein, 15 Feb 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (16 Feb 2022) by Paul Stoy
AR by Jessica Plein on behalf of the Authors (01 Apr 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (01 Apr 2022) by Paul Stoy
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (11 Apr 2022)
RR by V.M. Maire (19 Apr 2022)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (19 Apr 2022) by Paul Stoy
AR by Jessica Plein on behalf of the Authors (02 May 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Tundra vegetation and the carbon balance of Arctic ecosystems can be substantially impacted by herbivory. We tested how herbivory by brown lemmings in individual enclosure plots have impacted carbon exchange of tundra ecosystems via altering carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes. Lemmings significantly decreased net CO2 uptake while not affecting CH4 emissions. There was no significant difference in the subsequent growing season due to recovery of the vegetation.
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