Articles | Volume 19, issue 13
Biogeosciences, 19, 3247–3261, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-3247-2022
Biogeosciences, 19, 3247–3261, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-3247-2022
Research article
11 Jul 2022
Research article | 11 Jul 2022

Tracing the source of nitrate in a forested stream showing elevated concentrations during storm events

Weitian Ding et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2022-30', Anonymous Referee #1, 21 Mar 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Weitian Ding, 24 Apr 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2022-30', Anonymous Referee #2, 28 Mar 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Weitian Ding, 24 Apr 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (28 Apr 2022) by Perran Cook
AR by Weitian Ding on behalf of the Authors (14 Jun 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (15 Jun 2022) by Perran Cook
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (15 Jun 2022)
ED: Publish as is (24 Jun 2022) by Perran Cook
AR by Weitian Ding on behalf of the Authors (25 Jun 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Excessive leaching of nitrate from forested catchments during storm events degrades water quality and causes eutrophication in downstream areas. Thus, tracing the source of nitrate increase during storm events in forested streams is important for sustainable forest management. Based on the isotopic compositions of stream nitrate, including Δ17O, this study clarifies that the source of stream nitrate increase during storm events was soil nitrate in the riparian zone.
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