Articles | Volume 19, issue 22
Biogeosciences, 19, 5221–5236, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-5221-2022
Biogeosciences, 19, 5221–5236, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-5221-2022
Research article
18 Nov 2022
Research article | 18 Nov 2022

Temporal patterns and drivers of CO2 emission from dry sediments in a groyne field of a large river

Matthias Koschorreck et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2022-62', Anonymous Referee #1, 08 Apr 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Matthias Koschorreck, 11 Jul 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2022-62', Kenneth Thorø Martinsen, 24 Jun 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Matthias Koschorreck, 11 Jul 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (24 Aug 2022) by Gabriel Singer
AR by Matthias Koschorreck on behalf of the Authors (30 Sep 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (12 Oct 2022) by Gabriel Singer
AR by Matthias Koschorreck on behalf of the Authors (19 Oct 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
At low water levels, parts of the bottom of rivers fall dry. These beaches or mudflats emit the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. We found that those emissions are caused by microbial reactions in the sediment and that they change with time. Emissions were influenced by many factors like temperature, water level, rain, plants, and light.
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