Articles | Volume 19, issue 24
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-5707-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-5707-2022
Research article
 | 
15 Dec 2022
Research article |  | 15 Dec 2022

Cutting peatland CO2 emissions with water management practices

Jim Boonman, Mariet M. Hefting, Corine J. A. van Huissteden, Merit van den Berg, Jacobus (Ko) van Huissteden, Gilles Erkens, Roel Melman, and Ype van der Velde

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Latest update: 17 Jun 2024
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Short summary
Draining peat causes high CO2 emissions, and rewetting could potentially help solve this problem. In the dry year 2020 we measured that subsurface irrigation reduced CO2 emissions by 28 % and 83 % on two research sites. We modelled a peat parcel and found that the reduction depends on seepage and weather conditions and increases when using pressurized irrigation or maintaining high ditchwater levels. We found that soil temperature and moisture are suitable as indicators of peat CO2 emissions.
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