Articles | Volume 20, issue 14
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-20-2837-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-20-2837-2023
Research article
 | 
17 Jul 2023
Research article |  | 17 Jul 2023

Simulated methane emissions from Arctic ponds are highly sensitive to warming

Zoé Rehder, Thomas Kleinen, Lars Kutzbach, Victor Stepanenko, Moritz Langer, and Victor Brovkin

Related authors

Ignoring carbon emissions from thermokarst ponds results in overestimation of tundra net carbon uptake
Lutz Beckebanze, Zoé Rehder, David Holl, Christian Wille, Charlotta Mirbach, and Lars Kutzbach
Biogeosciences, 19, 1225–1244, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-1225-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-1225-2022, 2022
Short summary
Analyzing links between simulated Laptev Sea sea ice and atmospheric conditions over adjoining landmasses using causal-effect networks
Zoé Rehder, Anne Laura Niederdrenk, Lars Kaleschke, and Lars Kutzbach
The Cryosphere, 14, 4201–4215, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4201-2020,https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-14-4201-2020, 2020
Short summary

Related subject area

Biogeochemistry: Greenhouse Gases
Lawns and meadows in urban green space – a comparison from perspectives of greenhouse gases, drought resilience and plant functional types
Justine Trémeau, Beñat Olascoaga, Leif Backman, Esko Karvinen, Henriikka Vekuri, and Liisa Kulmala
Biogeosciences, 21, 949–972, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-21-949-2024,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-21-949-2024, 2024
Short summary
Large contribution of soil N2O emission to the global warming potential of a large-scale oil palm plantation despite changing from conventional to reduced management practices
Guantao Chen, Edzo Veldkamp, Muhammad Damris, Bambang Irawan, Aiyen Tjoa, and Marife D. Corre
Biogeosciences, 21, 513–529, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-21-513-2024,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-21-513-2024, 2024
Short summary
Identifying landscape hot and cold spots of soil greenhouse gas fluxes by combining field measurements and remote sensing data
Elizabeth Gachibu Wangari, Ricky Mwangada Mwanake, Tobias Houska, David Kraus, Gretchen Maria Gettel, Ralf Kiese, Lutz Breuer, and Klaus Butterbach-Bahl
Biogeosciences, 20, 5029–5067, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-20-5029-2023,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-20-5029-2023, 2023
Short summary
Enhanced Southern Ocean CO2 outgassing as a result of stronger and poleward shifted southern hemispheric westerlies
Laurie C. Menviel, Paul Spence, Andrew E. Kiss, Matthew A. Chamberlain, Hakase Hayashida, Matthew H. England, and Darryn Waugh
Biogeosciences, 20, 4413–4431, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-20-4413-2023,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-20-4413-2023, 2023
Short summary
Spatial and temporal variability of methane emissions and environmental conditions in a hyper-eutrophic fishpond
Petr Znachor, Jiří Nedoma, Vojtech Kolar, and Anna Matoušů
Biogeosciences, 20, 4273–4288, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-20-4273-2023,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-20-4273-2023, 2023
Short summary

Cited articles

Abnizova, A., Siemens, J., Langer, M., and Boike, J.: Small ponds with major impact: The relevance of ponds and lakes in permafrost landscapes to carbon dioxide emissions, Global Biogeochem. Cy., 26, GB2041, https://doi.org/10.1029/2011GB004237, 2012. a, b
Anderson, L., Birks, J., Rover, J., and Guldager, N.: Controls on recent Alaskan lake changes identified from water isotopes and remote sensing, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 3413–3418, https://doi.org/10.1002/grl.50672, 2013. a
Andresen, C. G. and Lougheed, V. L.: Disappearing Arctic tundra ponds: Fine-scale analysis of surface hydrology in drained thaw lake basins over a 65year period (1948–2013), J. Geophys. Res.-Biogeo., 120, 466–479, https://doi.org/10.1002/2014jg002778, 2015. a, b, c
Andresen, C. G., Lara, M. J., Tweedie, C. E., and Lougheed, V. L.: Rising plant-mediated methane emissions from arctic wetlands, Global Change Biol., 23, 1128–1139, https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.13469, 2017. a, b, c, d, e
Bazhin, N. M.: Gas transport in a residual layer of a water basin, Chemosphere, 3, 33–40, https://doi.org/10.1016/S1465-9972(00)00041-6, 2001. a
Download
Short summary
We use a new model to investigate how methane emissions from Arctic ponds change with warming. We find that emissions increase substantially. Under annual temperatures 5 °C above present temperatures, pond methane emissions are more than 3 times higher than now. Most of this increase is caused by an increase in plant productivity as plants provide the substrate microbes used to produce methane. We conclude that vegetation changes need to be included in predictions of pond methane emissions.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint