Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2017-205
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2017-205

  03 Jul 2017

03 Jul 2017

Status: this preprint has been retracted.

Winter phytoplankton blooms in the offshore south Adriatic waters (1995–2012) regulated by hydroclimatic events: Special emphasis on the exceptional bloom of 1995

Mirna Batistić1, Damir Viličić2, Vedrana Kovačević3, Nenad Jasprica1, Héloise Lavigne3, Marina Carić1, Rade Garić1, and Ana Car1 Mirna Batistić et al.
  • 1Institute for Marine and Coastal Research, University of Dubrovnik, Kneza Damjana Jude 12, 20000 Dubrovnik, Croatia
  • 2Division of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
  • 3Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale, Borgo Grotta Gigante 42/c, 34010 Sgonico, Trieste, Italy

Abstract. The characteristics and intensity of winter phytoplankton blooms in the open South Adriatic (OSA) were investigated by combining data on abundance and satellite-derived surface chlorophyll (1995–2012). Particular attention was paid to the different circulation regimes in the Ionian Sea, namely the anticyclonic and cyclonic Northern Ionian Gyres (NIG), both of which influence the physical and biochemical properties of the South Adriatic. Relatively high winter production was evident during both. Contrary to nutrient-poor cyclonic years, in nutrient-rich anticyclonic years, shallow vertical mixing is sufficient for enrichment of euphotic layers and bloom development. Moreover, intense blooms have occurred under certain hydroclimatic conditions: the East Mediterranean Transient (EMT), extreme winters, and reversal years that switch between anticyclonic and cyclonic circulation. Winter phytoplankton bloom in February 1995, with microphytoplankton abundance exceeding 105 cells L−1, was related to the phenomenon of EMT which produced dramatic changes in the East Mediterranean basin-wide circulation patterns. Dominance of a microphytoplankton species uncommonly encountered in the OSA may be related to strong inflow of Atlantic Water (AW) into the Adriatic during EMT and anticyclonic circulation in the NIG.

This preprint has been retracted.

Mirna Batistić et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Mirna Batistić et al.

Mirna Batistić et al.

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This preprint has been retracted.

Short summary
Contrary to earlier statements winter bloom is typical of the open South Adriatic. Its intensity depends on different water masses that enter the Adriatic, synergy of regional meteorology and mixing processes that affect these water masses. More intense blooms have occurred under certain hydroclimatic conditions: the East Mediterranean Transient (EMT), extreme winters, and reversal years that switch between anticyclonic and ciclonic circulation in the Ionian Sea.
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