Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-125
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-125

  18 May 2021

18 May 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal BG.

Ozone-induced gross primary productivity reductions over European forests inferred from satellite observations

Jasdeep Singh Anand1,2, Alessandro Anav3, Marcello Vitale4, Daniele Peano5, Nadine Unger6, Xu Yue7, Robert J. Parker1,2, and Hartmut Boesch1,2 Jasdeep Singh Anand et al.
  • 1Earth Observation Science, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK
  • 2National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO), University of Leicester, Leicester, UK
  • 3Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, National Agency for New Technologies (ENEA), Rome, Italy
  • 4Department of Environmental Biology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
  • 5Fondazione Centro Euro-Mediterraneo sui Cambiamenti Climatici, CSP, Bologna, Italy
  • 6College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, UK
  • 7Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Environment Monitoring and Pollution Control, Collaborative Innovation Center of Atmospheric Environment and Equipment Technology, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science Technology (NUIST), Nanjing, 210044, China

Abstract. Tropospheric O3 damages leaves and directly inhibits photosynthesis, posing a threat to terrestrial carbon sinks. Previous investigations have mostly relied on sparse in-situ data or simulations using land surface models. This work is the first to use satellite data to quantify the effect of O3 exposure on gross primary productivity (GPP). O3-induced GPP reductions were estimated to vary between 0.36–9.55% across European forests along a North-South transect between 2003–2015, in line with prior estimates. No significant temporal trend could be determined over most of Europe, while Random Forest analysis (RFA) shows that soil moisture is a significant variable governing GPP reductions over the Mediterranean. Comparisons between this work and GPP reductions simulated by the Yale Interactive Biosphere (YIBs) model suggest that satellite-based estimates over the Mediterranean region may be biased by +12%, potentially because of differences in modelling stomatal sensitivity to soil moisture and prior O3 exposure. This work has demonstrated for the first time that satellite-based datasets can be leveraged to assess the impact of O3 on the terrestrial carbon sink, which are comparable with in-situ or model-based analyses.

Jasdeep Singh Anand et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Review', Anonymous Referee #1, 17 Jun 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-125', Anonymous Referee #2, 26 Jul 2021

Jasdeep Singh Anand et al.

Jasdeep Singh Anand et al.

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Short summary
Ozone damages plants, which prevents them from absorbing CO2 from the atmosphere. This poses a potential threat to preventing dangerous climate change. In this work, satellite observations of forest cover, ozone, climate, and growing season are combined with an empirical model to estimate the carbon lost due to ozone exposure over Europe. The estimated carbon losses agree well with prior modelled estimates, showing for the first time that satellites can be used to better understand this effect.
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