Articles | Volume 13, issue 9
Biogeosciences, 13, 2637–2651, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-2637-2016
Biogeosciences, 13, 2637–2651, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-2637-2016

Research article 04 May 2016

Research article | 04 May 2016

Impact of water table level on annual carbon and greenhouse gas balances of a restored peat extraction area

Järvi Järveoja et al.

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Cited articles

Basiliko, N., Knowles, R., and Moore, T. R.: Roles of moss species and habitat in methane consumption potential in a northern peatland, Wetlands, 24, 178–185, https://doi.org/10.1672/0277-5212(2004)024[0178:ROMSAH]2.0.CO;2, 2004.
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Short summary
Restoration is suggested as a strategy to reduce the large greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from abandoned peat extraction areas. This study investigated GHG fluxes in restored sites with high and low water table level in comparison to a bare peat area. The results show that on the annual scale, both restored sites acted as similar GHG sources 3 years after restoration. However, their net GHG emissions were only half of those from the bare peat area, indicating considerable mitigation potential.
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