Articles | Volume 14, issue 18
Biogeosciences, 14, 4375–4389, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-4375-2017
Biogeosciences, 14, 4375–4389, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-4375-2017

Research article 29 Sep 2017

Research article | 29 Sep 2017

Carbon degradation in agricultural soils flooded with seawater after managed coastal realignment

Kamilla S. Sjøgaard et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (19 Mar 2017) by Caroline P. Slomp
AR by Kamilla Sjøgaard on behalf of the Authors (29 Apr 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (04 May 2017) by Caroline P. Slomp
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (08 May 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (16 May 2017)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (15 Jun 2017) by Caroline P. Slomp
AR by Kamilla Sjøgaard on behalf of the Authors (06 Jul 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (03 Aug 2017) by Caroline P. Slomp
ED: Publish as is (28 Aug 2017) by Caroline P. Slomp
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Short summary
Permanent flooding of low-lying coastal areas is a growing threat due to climate-change-related sea-level rise. To reduce coastal damage, buffer zones can be created by managed coastal realignment where existing dykes are breached and new dykes are built further inland. We studied the impacts on organic matter degradation in soils flooded with seawater by managed coastal realignment and suggest that most of the organic carbon present in coastal soils will be permanently preserved after flooding.
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