Articles | Volume 14, issue 23
Biogeosciences, 14, 5393–5402, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5393-2017
Biogeosciences, 14, 5393–5402, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5393-2017

Research article 01 Dec 2017

Research article | 01 Dec 2017

Modeling the effects of tree species and incubation temperature on soil's extracellular enzyme activity in 78-year-old tree plantations

Xiaoqi Zhou et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (08 Oct 2017) by Yakov Kuzyakov
AR by Xiaoqi Zhou on behalf of the Authors (21 Oct 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (23 Oct 2017) by Yakov Kuzyakov
AR by Xiaoqi Zhou on behalf of the Authors (24 Oct 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (24 Oct 2017) by Yakov Kuzyakov
AR by Xiaoqi Zhou on behalf of the Authors (26 Oct 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Here, we measured soil EEA using a gradient of incubation temperatures in 78-year-old tree plantations. We established a new tree species–enzyme–C/N model to explain why exotic slash pine can grow faster, as it has longer residual soil N residence time than native pine specie. To our knowledge this is the first study to clearly show that when soils with different C contents are subject to warming, high C soil has more C losses but differences in residual C between them become larger and larger.
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