Articles | Volume 15, issue 13
Biogeosciences, 15, 3953–3965, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-3953-2018
Biogeosciences, 15, 3953–3965, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-3953-2018

Research article 02 Jul 2018

Research article | 02 Jul 2018

Stable isotopes of nitrate reveal different nitrogen processing mechanisms in streams across a land use gradient during wet and dry periods

Wei Wen Wong et al.

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (20 Mar 2018) by Manmohan Sarin
AR by Wei Wen Wong on behalf of the Authors (23 Mar 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (27 Mar 2018) by Manmohan Sarin
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (16 Apr 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (18 Apr 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (01 May 2018) by Manmohan Sarin
AR by Wei Wen Wong on behalf of the Authors (22 May 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (01 Jun 2018) by Manmohan Sarin
AR by Wei Wen Wong on behalf of the Authors (06 Jun 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Over-enrichment of nitrate can pose substantial risk to the quality of freshwater ecosystems. Hence, understanding the dynamics of nitrate is the key to better management of waterways. This study evaluates the relationship between the effects of land use and rainfall on the major sources and processing of nitrate within and between five streams in five catchments spanning an agricultural land use gradient. We found that rainfall exerted significant control over the fate of nitrate.
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