Articles | Volume 16, issue 14
Biogeosciences, 16, 2923–2936, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-2923-2019
Biogeosciences, 16, 2923–2936, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-2923-2019

Research article 31 Jul 2019

Research article | 31 Jul 2019

Sensitivity of atmospheric CO2 to regional variability in particulate organic matter remineralization depths

Jamie D. Wilson et al.

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (15 Apr 2019) by Carol Robinson
AR by Jamie Wilson on behalf of the Authors (30 Apr 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (03 Jun 2019) by Carol Robinson
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (17 Jun 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #4 (17 Jun 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (25 Jun 2019) by Carol Robinson
AR by Jamie Wilson on behalf of the Authors (05 Jul 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (09 Jul 2019) by Carol Robinson
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Short summary
The remains of plankton rain down from the surface ocean to the deep ocean, acting to store CO2 in the deep ocean. We used a model of biology and ocean circulation to explore the importance of this process in different regions of the ocean. The amount of CO2 stored in the deep ocean is most sensitive to changes in the Southern Ocean. As plankton in the Southern Ocean are likely those most impacted by future climate change, the amount of CO2 they store in the deep ocean could also be affected.
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