Articles | Volume 17, issue 12
Biogeosciences, 17, 3149–3163, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-3149-2020
Biogeosciences, 17, 3149–3163, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-3149-2020

Research article 23 Jun 2020

Research article | 23 Jun 2020

Understanding tropical forest abiotic response to hurricanes using experimental manipulations, field observations, and satellite data

Ashley E. Van Beusekom et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (06 Dec 2019) by Sebastiaan Luyssaert
AR by Ashley Van Beusekom on behalf of the Authors (09 Dec 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (17 Jan 2020) by Sebastiaan Luyssaert
AR by Ashley Van Beusekom on behalf of the Authors (21 Feb 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (25 Feb 2020) by Sebastiaan Luyssaert
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (28 Mar 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (29 Mar 2020)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (05 Apr 2020) by Sebastiaan Luyssaert
AR by Ashley Van Beusekom on behalf of the Authors (07 May 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (21 May 2020) by Sebastiaan Luyssaert
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Short summary
This study looks at forest abiotic responses to canopy openness and debris deposition that follow a hurricane. We find that recovery to full canopy may take over half a decade and that recovery of humidity, soil moisture, and leaf saturation under the canopy is not monotonic and may temporarily look recovered before the response is over. Furthermore, we find that satellite data show a quicker recovery than field data, necessitating caution when looking at responses to hurricanes with satellites.
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