Articles | Volume 17, issue 24
Biogeosciences, 17, 6507–6525, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-6507-2020

Special issue: Ocean deoxygenation: drivers and consequences – past, present...

Biogeosciences, 17, 6507–6525, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-6507-2020

Research article 23 Dec 2020

Research article | 23 Dec 2020

A new intermittent regime of convective ventilation threatens the Black Sea oxygenation status

Arthur Capet et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (19 Aug 2020) by Katja Fennel
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (19 Aug 2020) by Katja Fennel(Co-Editor-in-Chief)
AR by Arthur Capet on behalf of the Authors (24 Sep 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (05 Oct 2020) by Katja Fennel
RR by Fabian Große (25 Oct 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (27 Oct 2020) by Katja Fennel
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (30 Oct 2020) by Katja Fennel(Co-Editor-in-Chief)
AR by Arthur Capet on behalf of the Authors (13 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (16 Nov 2020) by Katja Fennel
ED: Publish as is (16 Nov 2020) by Katja Fennel(Co-Editor-in-Chief)
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Short summary
The Black Sea is 2000 m deep, but, due to limited ventilation, only about the upper 100 m contains enough oxygen to support marine life such as fish. This oxygenation depth has been shown to be decreasing (1955–2019). Here, we evidence that atmospheric warming induced a clear shift in an important ventilation mechanism. We highlight the impact of this shift on oxygenation. There are important implications for marine life and carbon and nutrient cycling if this new ventilation regime persists.
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