Articles | Volume 18, issue 5
Biogeosciences, 18, 1689–1701, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-1689-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 1689–1701, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-1689-2021

Research article 10 Mar 2021

Research article | 10 Mar 2021

Enhancement of the North Atlantic CO2 sink by Arctic Waters

Jon Olafsson et al.

Data sets

Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete samples, profile and time series profile observations during the R/Vs Arni Fridriksson and Bjarni Saemundsson time series IcelandSea (LN6) cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1985-02-22 to 2013-11-26 (NCEI Accession 0100063), J. Ólafsson https://doi.org/10.3334/cdiac/otg.carina_icelandsea

Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from ARNI FRIDRIKSSON and BJARNI SAEMUN J. Ólafsson https://doi.org/10.3334/cdiac/otg.carina_irmingersea_v2

Global Ocean Surface Water Partial Pressure of CO2 Database: Measurements Performed During 1957–2018 (LDEO Database Version 2018) (NCEI Accession 0160492), Version 7.7 T. Takahashi, S. C. Sutherland, and A. Kozyr https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/OTG.NDP088(V2015)

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Short summary
The Atlantic north of 50° N is an intense ocean sink area for atmospheric CO2. Observations in the vicinity of Iceland reveal a previously unrecognized Arctic contribution to the North Atlantic CO2 sink. Sustained CO2 influx to waters flowing from the Arctic Ocean is linked to their excess alkalinity derived from sources in the changing Arctic. The results relate to the following question: will the North Atlantic continue to absorb CO2 in the future as it has in the past?
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