Articles | Volume 18, issue 5
Biogeosciences, 18, 1689–1701, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-1689-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 1689–1701, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-1689-2021

Research article 10 Mar 2021

Research article | 10 Mar 2021

Enhancement of the North Atlantic CO2 sink by Arctic Waters

Jon Olafsson et al.

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Cited articles

Anderson, L. G., Jutterström, S., Kaltin, S., and Jones, E. P.: Variability in river runoff distribution in the Eurasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean, J. Geophys. Res., 109, C01016, https://doi.org/10.1029/2003JC001733, 2004. 
Anderson, L. G., Ek, J., Ericson, Y., Humborg, C., Semiletov, I., Sundbom, M., and Ulfsbo, A.: Export of calcium carbonate corrosive waters from the East Siberian Sea, Biogeosciences, 14, 1811–1823, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-1811-2017, 2017. 
Atlas, R., Hoffman, R. N., Ardizzone, J., Leidner, S. M., Jusem, J. C., Smith, D. K., and Gombos, D.: A cross-calibrated multiplatform ocean surface wind velocity product for meteorological and oceanographic applications, B. Am. Meteorol. Soc., 92, 157–174, https://doi.org/10.1109/IGARSS.2008.4778804, 2011. 
Bates, N. R.: Air-sea CO2 fluxes and the continental shelf pump of carbon in the Chukchi Sea adjacent to the Arctic Ocean, J. Geophys. Res.-Oceans, 111, C10013, https://doi.org/10.1029/2005jc003083, 2006. 
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Short summary
The Atlantic north of 50° N is an intense ocean sink area for atmospheric CO2. Observations in the vicinity of Iceland reveal a previously unrecognized Arctic contribution to the North Atlantic CO2 sink. Sustained CO2 influx to waters flowing from the Arctic Ocean is linked to their excess alkalinity derived from sources in the changing Arctic. The results relate to the following question: will the North Atlantic continue to absorb CO2 in the future as it has in the past?
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