Articles | Volume 18, issue 5
Biogeosciences, 18, 1803–1822, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-1803-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 1803–1822, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-1803-2021
Research article
16 Mar 2021
Research article | 16 Mar 2021

An observation-based evaluation and ranking of historical Earth system model simulations in the northwest North Atlantic Ocean

Arnaud Laurent et al.

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Short summary
CMIP5 and CMIP6 models, and a high-resolution regional model, were evaluated by comparing historical simulations with observations in the northwest North Atlantic, a climate-sensitive and biologically productive ocean margin region. Many of the CMIP models performed poorly for biological properties. There is no clear link between model resolution and skill in the global models, but there is an overall improvement in performance in CMIP6 from CMIP5. The regional model performed best.
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