Articles | Volume 18, issue 2
Biogeosciences, 18, 343–365, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-343-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 343–365, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-343-2021

Research article 18 Jan 2021

Research article | 18 Jan 2021

Variability of the surface energy balance in permafrost-underlain boreal forest

Simone Maria Stuenzi et al.

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Boreal forests in eastern Siberia are an essential component of global climate patterns. We use a physically based model and field measurements to study the interactions between forests, permanently frozen ground and the atmosphere. We find that forests exert a strong control on the thermal state of permafrost through changing snow cover dynamics and altering the surface energy balance, through absorbing most of the incoming solar radiation and suppressing below-canopy turbulent fluxes.
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