Articles | Volume 18, issue 15
Biogeosciences, 18, 4549–4570, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-4549-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 4549–4570, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-4549-2021

Research article 09 Aug 2021

Research article | 09 Aug 2021

Variability of North Atlantic CO2 fluxes for the 2000–2017 period estimated from atmospheric inverse analyses

Zhaohui Chen et al.

Data sets

Global surface-ocean pCO2 and sea–air CO2 flux variability from an observation-driven ocean mixed-layer scheme Rödenbeck et al., 2013 https://doi.org/10.5194/os-9-193-2013

Decadal variations and trends of the global ocean carbon sink Landschuetzer et al., 2016 https://doi.org/10.1002/2015GB005359

Climatological mean and decadal change in surface ocean pCO2, and net sea--air CO2 flux over the global oceans Takahashi et al., 2009 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr2.2008.12.009

CarbonTracker CT2019, Model published by NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division Jacobson et al., 2020 http://carbontracker.noaa.gov

The CarbonTracker Data Assimilation Shell (CTDAS) v1.0: implementation and global carbon balance 2001-2015 van der Laan-Luijkx et al., 2017 https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-10-2785-2017

Objective evaluation of surface- and satellite-driven carbon dioxide atmospheric inversions Chevallier et al., 2019 https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-14233-2019

LSCE-FFNN-v1: a two-step neural network model for the reconstruction of surface ocean pCO2 over the global ocean Denvil-Sommer et al., 2019 https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-12-2091-2019

Trends in pCO2 and sea-air CO2 flux over the global open oceans for the last two decades Iida et al., 2015 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10872-015-0306-4

Surface ocean CO2 in 1990-2011 modelled using a feed-forward neural network Zeng et al., 2015 https://doi.org/10.1002/gdj3.26

Download
Short summary
As the global temperature continues to increase, carbon dioxide (CO2) is a major driver of this global warming. The increased CO2 is mainly caused by emissions from fossil fuel use and land use. At the same time, the ocean is a significant sink in the carbon cycle. The North Atlantic is a critical ocean region in reducing CO2 concentration. We estimate the CO2 uptake in this region based on a carbon inverse system and atmospheric CO2 observations.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint