Articles | Volume 18, issue 15
Biogeosciences, 18, 4549–4570, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-4549-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 4549–4570, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-4549-2021
Research article
09 Aug 2021
Research article | 09 Aug 2021

Variability of North Atlantic CO2 fluxes for the 2000–2017 period estimated from atmospheric inverse analyses

Zhaohui Chen et al.

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Cited articles

Bopp, L., Resplandy, L., Orr, J. C., Doney, S. C., Dunne, J. P., Gehlen, M., Halloran, P., Heinze, C., Ilyina, T., Séférian, R., Tjiputra, J., and Vichi, M.: Multiple stressors of ocean ecosystems in the 21st century: projections with CMIP5 models, Biogeosciences, 10, 6225–6245, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-10-6225-2013, 2013. 
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Buitenhuis, E. T., Hashioka, T., and Le Quéré, C.: Combined constraints on global ocean primary production using observations and models, Global Biogeochem. Cy., 27, 847–858, https://doi.org/10.1002/gbc.20074, 2013. 
Carouge, C., Bousquet, P., Peylin, P., Rayner, P. J., and Ciais, P.: What can we learn from European continuous atmospheric CO2 measurements to quantify regional fluxes – Part 1: Potential of the 2001 network, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 3107–3117, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-10-3107-2010, 2010. 
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Short summary
As the global temperature continues to increase, carbon dioxide (CO2) is a major driver of this global warming. The increased CO2 is mainly caused by emissions from fossil fuel use and land use. At the same time, the ocean is a significant sink in the carbon cycle. The North Atlantic is a critical ocean region in reducing CO2 concentration. We estimate the CO2 uptake in this region based on a carbon inverse system and atmospheric CO2 observations.
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