Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-29
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-29
19 Feb 2019
 | 19 Feb 2019
Status: this preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Effects of nitrogen deposition on growing-season soil methane sink across global forest biomes

Enzai Du, Nan Xia, and Wim de Vries

Abstract. Anthropogenic alteration of global nitrogen (N) deposition has resulted in profound impacts on soil fluxes of greenhouse gases in terrestrial ecosystems. However, the response of soil methane (CH4) flux to N deposition remains poorly quantified in global forest. Based on a synthesis of experimental results from literature, we evaluated the effects of N deposition on growing-season soil CH4 flux across forest biomes. A distinction was made between low-level N addition that is comparable with the worldwide range in N deposition (< 60 kg N−1 yr−1) and high-level N addition (> 60 kg N−1 yr−1. The results showed that growing-season soil CH4 flux was significantly affected by N additions, the value being dependent on the N addition level and forest biome. Low-level N addition significantly increased growing-season soil CH4 uptake in boreal forest, while an opposite effect occurred in temperate and subtropical forests. However, high-level N addition significantly decreased growing-season soil CH4 uptake across boreal, temperate, and subtropical forests. At biome scale, current N deposition was estimate to increase growing-season soil CH4 sink by 0.029 Tg CH4 in boreal forest, while it decreased growing-season soil CH4 sink by 0.025 Tg CH4 and 0.051 Tg CH4 in temperate and subtropical forests, respectively. This work improves our understanding of biome-specific effect of N deposition on soil CH4 uptake and identifies knowledge gaps in the effect of N deposition on soil CH4 flux in tropical forest.

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Enzai Du, Nan Xia, and Wim de Vries

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Enzai Du, Nan Xia, and Wim de Vries
Enzai Du, Nan Xia, and Wim de Vries

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Short summary
Based on an analysis of the results from existing N addition experiments, the effect of N deposition on growing-season soil CH4 flux was assessed across global forest biomes. The results showed that growing-season soil CH4 flux was significantly affected by N additions, the effect being dependent on the N addition level and forest biome. This work improves our understanding of biome-specific effect of N deposition on soil CH4 uptake, which should be considered by process-based models.
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