Articles | Volume 17, issue 5
Biogeosciences, 17, 1231–1245, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-1231-2020
Biogeosciences, 17, 1231–1245, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-1231-2020

Research article 06 Mar 2020

Research article | 06 Mar 2020

Deep-sea sponge grounds as nutrient sinks: denitrification is common in boreo-Arctic sponges

Christine Rooks et al.

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (03 Oct 2019) by Jack Middelburg
AR by Friederike Hoffmann on behalf of the Authors (04 Oct 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (08 Oct 2019) by Jack Middelburg
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (22 Oct 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (29 Nov 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (02 Dec 2019) by Jack Middelburg
AR by Friederike Hoffmann on behalf of the Authors (07 Jan 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (20 Jan 2020) by Jack Middelburg
AR by Friederike Hoffmann on behalf of the Authors (28 Jan 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Sponge grounds are known as nutrient sources, providing nitrate and ammonium to the ocean. We found that they also can do the opposite: in six species from Arctic and North Atlantic sponge grounds, we measured high rates of denitrification, which remove these nutrients from the sea. Rates were highest when the sponge tissue got low in oxygen, which happens when sponges stop pumping because of stress. Sponge grounds may become nutrient sinks when exposed to stress.
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