Articles | Volume 19, issue 17
Biogeosciences, 19, 4209–4226, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-4209-2022
Biogeosciences, 19, 4209–4226, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-4209-2022
Research article
08 Sep 2022
Research article | 08 Sep 2022

Carbon dynamics at the river–estuarine transition: a comparison among tributaries of Chesapeake Bay

Paul A. Bukaveckas

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-209', Anonymous Referee #1, 15 Nov 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-209', Anonymous Referee #2, 07 Dec 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (15 Dec 2021) by Aninda Mazumdar
AR by Paul Bukaveckas on behalf of the Authors (16 Dec 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (08 Jan 2022) by Aninda Mazumdar
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (09 Jun 2022)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (09 Jun 2022) by Aninda Mazumdar
AR by Paul Bukaveckas on behalf of the Authors (17 Jun 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (26 Jun 2022) by Aninda Mazumdar
RR by Sayak Basu (06 Aug 2022)
ED: Publish as is (06 Aug 2022) by Aninda Mazumdar
AR by Paul Bukaveckas on behalf of the Authors (08 Aug 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Inland waters play an important role in the global carbon cycle by storing, transforming and transporting carbon from land to sea. Comparatively little is known about carbon dynamics at the river–estuarine transition. A study of tributaries of Chesapeake Bay showed that biological processes exerted a strong effect on carbon transformations. Peak carbon retention occurred during periods of elevated river discharge and was associated with trapping of particulate matter.
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