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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Recent observations from today’s oceans revealed that oxygen concentrations are decreasing, and oxygen minimum zones are expanding together with current climate change. With the aim of understanding past climatic events and their relationship with oxygen content, we looked at the fossils, called benthic foraminifera, preserved in the sediment archives from the Peruvian margin and quantified the bottom-water oxygen content for the last 22 000 years.
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BG | Articles | Volume 17, issue 12
Biogeosciences, 17, 3165–3182, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-3165-2020

Special issue: Ocean deoxygenation: drivers and consequences – past, present...

Biogeosciences, 17, 3165–3182, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-3165-2020

Research article 24 Jun 2020

Research article | 24 Jun 2020

Bottom-water deoxygenation at the Peruvian margin during the last deglaciation recorded by benthic foraminifera

Zeynep Erdem et al.

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Latest update: 22 Jan 2021
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Recent observations from today’s oceans revealed that oxygen concentrations are decreasing, and oxygen minimum zones are expanding together with current climate change. With the aim of understanding past climatic events and their relationship with oxygen content, we looked at the fossils, called benthic foraminifera, preserved in the sediment archives from the Peruvian margin and quantified the bottom-water oxygen content for the last 22 000 years.
Citation
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Final-revised paper
Preprint