Articles | Volume 18, issue 19
Biogeosciences, 18, 5491–5511, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-5491-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 5491–5511, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-5491-2021

Research article 11 Oct 2021

Research article | 11 Oct 2021

Microbial activity, methane production, and carbon storage in Early Holocene North Sea peats

Tanya J. R. Lippmann et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (25 Mar 2021) by Aninda Mazumdar
AR by Tanya Lippmann on behalf of the Authors (29 Apr 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (12 May 2021) by Aninda Mazumdar
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (28 Jun 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (05 Jul 2021) by Aninda Mazumdar
AR by Tanya Lippmann on behalf of the Authors (13 Jul 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (16 Aug 2021) by Aninda Mazumdar
AR by Tanya Lippmann on behalf of the Authors (20 Aug 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
This paper is a step towards understanding the basal peat ecosystem beneath the North Sea. Plant remains followed parallel sequences. Methane concentrations were low with local exceptions, with the source likely being trapped pockets of millennia-old methane. Microbial community structure indicated the absence of a biofilter and was diverse across sites. Large carbon stores in the presence of methanogens and in the absence of methanotrophs have the potential to be metabolized into methane.
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