Articles | Volume 19, issue 9
Biogeosciences, 19, 2333–2351, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2333-2022
Biogeosciences, 19, 2333–2351, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2333-2022
Research article
05 May 2022
Research article | 05 May 2022

Changing sub-Arctic tundra vegetation upon permafrost degradation: impact on foliar mineral element cycling

Elisabeth Mauclet et al.

Data sets

Carbon in Permafrost Experimental Heating Research (CIPEHR) project: Foliar mineral element concentrations, stocks, and annual litterfall fluxes in July 2009 and 2017 E. Mauclet, S. Opfergelt, Y. Agnan, C. Hirst, A. Monhonval, J. Ledman, M. Taylor, and E. A. G. Schuur https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/597c40c5d699eec918da3e9c2eaa7bea

Eight Mile Lake Research Watershed, Thaw Gradient: Foliar mineral element concentrations, stocks and annual litterfall fluxes estimated for July 2017 E. Mauclet, S. Opfergelt, Y. Agnan, C. Hirst, A. Monhonval, J. Ledman, M. Taylor, and E. A. G. Schuur https://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/7fad9398ec3a596b8efc092fc8fbf55d

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Short summary
Arctic warming and permafrost degradation largely affect tundra vegetation. Wetter lowlands show an increase in sedges, whereas drier uplands favor shrub expansion. Here, we demonstrate that the difference in the foliar elemental composition of typical tundra vegetation species controls the change in local foliar elemental stock and potential mineral element cycling through litter production upon a shift in tundra vegetation.
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