Articles | Volume 19, issue 9
Biogeosciences, 19, 2333–2351, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2333-2022
Biogeosciences, 19, 2333–2351, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2333-2022
Research article
05 May 2022
Research article | 05 May 2022

Changing sub-Arctic tundra vegetation upon permafrost degradation: impact on foliar mineral element cycling

Elisabeth Mauclet et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-263', Jonathan von Oppen, 30 Nov 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Elisabeth Mauclet, 24 Jan 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-263', Anonymous Referee #2, 16 Jan 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Elisabeth Mauclet, 24 Jan 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (10 Feb 2022) by Anja Rammig
AR by Elisabeth Mauclet on behalf of the Authors (12 Feb 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (18 Feb 2022) by Anja Rammig
RR by Jonathan von Oppen (19 Feb 2022)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (28 Feb 2022) by Anja Rammig
AR by Elisabeth Mauclet on behalf of the Authors (04 Mar 2022)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (30 Mar 2022) by Anja Rammig
RR by Jonathan von Oppen (01 Apr 2022)
ED: Publish as is (04 Apr 2022) by Anja Rammig
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Short summary
Arctic warming and permafrost degradation largely affect tundra vegetation. Wetter lowlands show an increase in sedges, whereas drier uplands favor shrub expansion. Here, we demonstrate that the difference in the foliar elemental composition of typical tundra vegetation species controls the change in local foliar elemental stock and potential mineral element cycling through litter production upon a shift in tundra vegetation.
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