Articles | Volume 19, issue 9
Biogeosciences, 19, 2333–2351, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2333-2022
Biogeosciences, 19, 2333–2351, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-2333-2022
Research article
05 May 2022
Research article | 05 May 2022

Changing sub-Arctic tundra vegetation upon permafrost degradation: impact on foliar mineral element cycling

Elisabeth Mauclet et al.

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Short summary
Arctic warming and permafrost degradation largely affect tundra vegetation. Wetter lowlands show an increase in sedges, whereas drier uplands favor shrub expansion. Here, we demonstrate that the difference in the foliar elemental composition of typical tundra vegetation species controls the change in local foliar elemental stock and potential mineral element cycling through litter production upon a shift in tundra vegetation.
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